North Dakota Birth Records Search

North Dakota’s Department of Health office maintains all North Dakota birth records and issues certificates upon request.

North Dakota keeps all birth records confidential so only the following people may obtain a copy of your specific North Dakota birth record: you, if you are 16 or older, your mother, father or someone with a court order.

If you are deceased then a member of your immediate family, such as your child or grandchild can request a copy.

You must prove your identity before requesting a North Dakota birth record search. You can do so with the following forms of photo ID: state-issued ID, tribal, military ID, passport, driver's license or a permanent resident card.

If you do not have one of the above, you must supply two of the following:

  • Social security card.
  • Utility bill with your current address on it.
  • Bank statement with your current address on it.
  • A recent pay stub with your SSN and name and address of your employer.
  • Car registration.
  • Tax return.

Types of North Dakota Birth Records

North Dakota offers two types of birth records for you to purchase.

  • Genealogy Copy - this type of birth record is not to be used for legal purposes but only for research and family history.
  • Certified - a certified copy is a legal document that you can use to prove your identity and apply for government benefits, education, or to get a driver’s license or passport.

North Dakota Population

Although North Dakota is pretty large in landmass, it is sparsely populated with only 755,238 inhabitants. It does have the 2nd highest growth rate in the country of 1.99%.

North Dakota is quite large with a total surface area of 70,700 square miles with only 9.7 people per square mile. They are the 47th most densely populated state in America. Fargo is the largest city with a population of 118,523 people.

North Dakota became a State on November 2, 1889.

785,037
State Population
1 birth every 2771 seconds

1 death every 4157 seconds

Population change from 2010-2016

Population by Gender

There are less women than men in North Dakota. The total population of North Dakota is estimated at 755,548 people with 387,936 male and 367,612 female. There are 20,324 less more women than men in the state, which is 48.66% of the total population.

The North Dakota Gender Ratio is 106 men to 100 women (99:100) or 1.06. State’s gender ratio is higher than the national average of 97 men to 100 women (97:100) or 0.97.

Gender ratio in 2016

106
Men
100
Women

Total population in 2016

387,936
Men
367,612
Women

Timeline of male/female population from 2010-2016

North Dakota Birth Statistics

The state's birth rate decreased to 15.04 births per 1,000 population in 2016 with 11,383 total births making it higher than the national birth rate - 11.95 births per 1000 women. The total number of births for 2016 was 11,383, 0.29% of the number of nationwide registered births.

State Birth Rate

Top 5 States with Lower/Higher Birth Rates than North Dakota

Top 5 states with a lower birth rate than North Dakota Top 2 states with a higher birth rate than North Dakota
Mississippi - 12.59Utah - 16.47
Georgia - 12.63Alaska - 15.12
Delaware - 11.55
New Jersey - 10.92
Arizona - 11.68

Top 5 Counties in North Dakota with the lowest/highest Birth Rate

Top 5 counties in North Dakota with the lowest birth rate Top 5 counties in North Dakota with the highest birth rate
Cass County - 15.06Cass County - 15.06

North Dakota Fertility Rate

In North Dakota the fertility rate based on historical data went from 67.65 to 73.67 from 2010-2016, and currently is higher than the crude fertility rate of the US - 77.27 births per 1000 women. The state reproductive age of the mother has seen an increase during the last 6 years, going from 27.63 to 28.65.

State fertility rate timeline with the average age of mother

State Average Birth Weight and LMP Gestational Age

Where to Obtain a North Dakota Birth Certificate

You can obtain a copy of your birth certificate through the mail, online, by fax and visit in person. You will have to pay a $7 fee for the first copy and $4 for each additional copy.

If you order by mail, send your completed application, check or money order made out to ND Department of Health and photo ID to:

Division of Vital Records

600 E. Boulevard Ave. - Dept. 301

Bismarck, ND 58505-0200

Order by mail will take longer, but you can pay extra for expedited shipping with UPS and Federal Express.

You may also visit them in person at 118 in the Judicial Wing of the State Capitol Building in Bismarck, ND weekdays between 7:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m.

If you visit in person, you can have your copy within just a few minutes.

If you have questions about the application process or forms of ID, you can contact them at (701) 328-2360 or by e-mail at vitalrec@nd.gov.

You may also order online through the VitalChek system.

North Dakota Department of Public Health

Cost of copy: $7.00
Organization: ND Department of Health; Division of Vital Records
Address:600 East Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 301, Bismarck, ND 58505-0200
Remarks: The State office has records since July 1905. For earlier records, contact the County Recorder in the county where the event occurred. A personal check or money order should be made payable to CDPH Vital Records. Please do not send cash. To verify current fees, the telephone number is (916) 445-2684. This will be a recorded message, with an option to talk to a customer service representative. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the North Dakota Department of Public Health website. In order to obtain a Certified Copy you MUST complete the sworn statement included with the birth certificate application form, sign the statement under penalty of perjury and, your sworn statement must be notarized. If your request indicates that you want a Certified Copy but does not include a notarized statement sworn under penalty of perjury, the request will be rejected as incomplete and returned to you without being processed. If you request a Certified Informational Copy of the record, a notarized sworn statement is not required. Please refer to the CDPH website for further information about Informational Copies. Effective November 1, 2013, CDPH - Vital Records is no longer embossing certified copies of records.